Mar 20 2011

What Is A Religion?

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Some experts say that religion is an organized belief system that recognizes a higher power or a spiritual dimension in humans. “They” also say that a belief system needs sacred texts, an organization, and rituals. How does this reflect your understanding of your Pagan path?

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Feb 08 2011

Sexual Ethics – February 15

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My Freedom Ends at Your Boundary – Everyone is talking about Pagan sexual ethics. What are sexual ethics and how do they apply to us? How might Pagans view sexuality differently from some others? What do we do when there is a violation in our community? What is a violation? How do we teach the next generation of Pagans?

If you haven’t been to the Pagan Round Table, you are missing a wonderful experience and the chance to interact in a positive way with others from lots of varying backgrounds.

Mayflower Bistro, 1420 Colonial Life Boulevard (right by Dutch Square Mall, in Columbia, SC, next to Melting Pot, plenty of parking. All are welcome. Questions, 803-422-4565, or sekhmet@osireion.com, or visit the Columbia (and the Surrounding Areas) Meetup at www.meetup.com

Bring a friend, and come prepared for a great discussion, keeping in mind the following group agreements:
• We’ll announce the topic and/or guest for the evening at 6:30. We recommend that you order your food as soon as possible since we start discussion at 6:30.
• The facilitator will introduce the topic for the night with a question. After this introduction, all are invited to participate by sharing comments and/or questions of your own.
• Please limit your comments to no more than two minutes. A facilitator will call on people, if needed, e.g., if many try to speak at once or we have a very large crowd.
• No personally-affrontive comments are tolerated. Open disrespect of others, or of other religions, will earn you an escort out of the room for the rest of the evening.
• If you are not Pagan, thank you for coming, and you are very welcome to participate, but you may not evangelize or proselytize, or you will be asked to leave.
• At 7:45 PM, the facilitator will begin to draw the discussion to a close. If necessary, the facilitator will say how many more people have time for a comment, or point to the one, two or three people who may speak in the remaining time.

No responses yet

Jan 11 2011

Culture Wars – Jan 18

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Do you smudge like Native Americans? Use the trance technique of a Siberian shaman? Call on Ganesh for help but don’t know Shiva or Kali? Love Brighde although your roots are in the Congo? Some call it cultural appropriation, with a negative connotation, and others say the world’s a melting pot.  Why is crossing cultures fraught with hazards, what is cultural appropriation, and how can we learn or even borrow from cultures respectfully?

(Read before January 18 what others are saying at some of the links at the bottom of this message)

If you haven’t been to the Pagan Round Table, you are missing a wonderful experience and the chance to interact in a positive way with others from lots of varying backgrounds.

Mayflower (formerly Queenstown) Bistro, 1420 Colonial Life Boulevard (right by Dutch Square Mall, next to Melting Pot, across from one of the old Sounds Familiar stores which is now closed) plenty of parking. All are welcome. Questions, sekhmet @ osireion.com, or visit the Columbia (and the Surrounding Areas) Meetup at www.meetup.com

Bring a friend, and come prepared for a great discussion, keeping in mind the group agreements posted below, March 2010.

From a Unitarian Universalist minister: When we sing an African-American spiritual during worship does that act honor another culture or is it cultural misappropriation? Can we hold a Seder if we’re not Jewish? Can our children make Native American dream catchers in religious education classes?

From an anonymous blogger: It’s the oppression, stupid.  In other words: A Japanese teen wearing a t-shirt emblazoned with the logo of a big American company is not the same as Madonna sporting a bindi as part of her latest reinvention. The difference is history and power. Colonization has made Western Anglo culture supreme–powerful and coveted. It is understood in its diversity and nuance as other cultures can only hope to be. Ignorance of culture that is a burden to Asians, African and indigenous peoples, is unknown to most European descendants or at least lacks the same negative impact.  It matters who is doing the appropriating. If a dominant culture fancies some random element (a mode of dress, a manner of speaking, a style of music) of my culture interesting or exotic, but otherwise disdains my being and seeks to marginalize me, it is surely an insult.

“Her Hidden Children” author Chas Clifton: Pagans are well-placed to realize that religion is a creative activity. Writers incorporate the influence of other writers, musicians “steal” from other musicians, actors learn from other actors—why should religious practitioners be any different.

Kulasundari Devi guest blogs at The Wild Hunt: While much of the Pagan world is involved in creating new traditions, reconstructing ancient ones, and everything in between, there are more and more Pagans who are drawn to living traditions such as the various African diasporic religions, Buddhism, and Hinduism.

Indian Donna Smith makes a passionate appeal: The protection of any Nation’s traditions is vital to its cultural survival. As has been well documented over the last several centuries, when a culture is invaded by outside forces – be they materialistic forces, military forces, or forces that claim to speak on behalf of a religion, which is not the same as a spiritual force – the original ways can and have been lost. Forever. When an old way is blended with anything foreign, it is no longer an original way. It has become bastardized – mixed, blended……forever changed.

Comments Off on Culture Wars – Jan 18

Nov 25 2010

See you in January

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Don’t forget that the Pagan Round Table will take a break in December. Join us on January 18 to discuss Culture Wars: Do you smudge like Native Americans? Use the trance technique of a Siberian shaman? Call on Ganesh for help but don’t know Shiva or Kali? Love Brighde although your roots are in the Congo? Why is crossing cultures fraught with hazards, what is cultural appropriation, and how can we learn or even borrow from cultures respectfully?

No responses yet

Nov 02 2010

Children & The Pagan Home-Nov 16

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7crow
Where I sit is holy,
Holy is the ground.
Forest, mountain, river
Listen to the sound.
Great Spirit circle
All around me.
—Blackfoot chant

As we approach Yule, what a wonderful time to introduce children to our sacred stories and the Wheel of the Year. As parents we ask:

Who should teach our children?
What should they be taught?
When and where to we teach our children?
How do we go about it?

Join us for a hands-on simple approach to beginning the journey with our children. Each participant will go home with a copy of a simple Wheel of the Year curriculum.

Guest facilitator Ginny Parrish-Loy is the former Director of Religious Education for the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Clemson.

No responses yet

Oct 07 2010

When The Veil Is Thin – Oct 19

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labyrinthpamwood

Approaching Samhain, most of us contemplate the difficult subject of death.

How do we approach the end of life as Pagans?

How do we assist those close to us who are nearing their end?

What is our relationship with the ancestors?

Is Samhain only about death?

Guest facilitator Jim will lead this discussion about the most sacred time in the wheel of the year.
Queenstown Bistro, 1420 Colonial Life Boulevard, Columbia, SC (right by Dutch Square Mall, next to Melting Pot, across from one of the old Sounds Familiar stores which is now closed) plenty of parking. All are welcome. Questions, 803-798-8007, or sekhmet@osireion.com, or visit the Columbia (and the Surrounding Areas) Meetup at www.meetup.com.  Bring a friend, and come prepared for a great discussion, keeping in mind the following group agreements:

  • We’ll announce the topic and/or guest for the evening at 6:30. We recommend that you order your food as soon as possible since we start discussion at 6:30.
  • The facilitator will introduce the topic for the night with a question. After this introduction, all are invited to participate by sharing comments and/or questions of your own.
  • Please limit your comments to no more than two minutes. A facilitator will call on people, if needed, e.g., if many try to speak at once or we have a very large crowd.
  • No personally-affrontive comments are tolerated. Open disrespect of others, or of other religions, will earn you an escort out of the room for the rest of the evening.
  • If you are not Pagan, thank you for coming, and you are very welcome to participate, but you may not evangelize or proselytize, or you will be asked to leave.
  • At 7:45 PM, the facilitator will begin to draw the discussion to a close. If necessary, the facilitator will say how many more people have time for a comment, or point to the one, two or three people who may speak in the remaining time.

No responses yet

Aug 27 2010

The Religion We Left Behind – September 21

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story-nicaea1-wmaster

Do we leave our birth religion behind?   As Pagans, have we simply substituted one god or pantheon for another?   The discussion this month is about coming to terms with our religious baggage – venting, grieving, healing, and then making peace.

(above, Nicholas strikes Arius at the Council of Nicaea)

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Jul 27 2010

GoddessCraft – August 17

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cucutenii-femeia3

It’s craft night at the Pagan Round Table! Bring a dollar or your own package of Femo/Sculpy polymer clay and we will make amulets based on the artifacts catalogued by noted archaeologist Marija Gimbutas (Language of the Goddess, also the subject of the film “Signs Out of Time” by Starhawk and Donna Read).

Read more about Gimbutas here.

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Jul 15 2010

July 20 Building Our Community

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This topic generated so much interest in the spring that we are revisiting it!  Here are some discussion starters, plus bring your own questions:

1.       Should we, as pagans, have a public community?  What does that mean?

2.       How can  we support a pagan community (Financially? As volunteers? Other?)

3.       Should we bother building a pagan community

4.       Should pagans support other pagans who don’t think like they do?

5.       What are we doing with our paganism to improve the world and society that we live in?

6.       How do we get along with other pagans?

7.       Should pagans “tithe” or otherwise give funds regularly to a group or coven?

Our facilitator has issued a challenge to everyone to bring at least one friend to this PRT!

No responses yet

Jun 01 2010

June 15 Children and Paganism

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Join the discussion every third Tuesday in Columbia, SC.

Children and Paganism

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What pagan community resources are available for pagan parents? Are there any?
What are the consequences of being open about paganism with your children?
What pagan friendly educational resources are out there?
What community and educational resources need to be created for children from pagan households?
What pagan community resources are available for pagan parents? Are there any?
What are the consequences of being open about paganism with your children?
What pagan friendly educational resources are out there?
What community and educational resources need to be created for children from pagan households?

Location: Mayflower Bistro (the recently renamed Queenstown Bistro), 1420 Colonial Life Boulevard (right by Dutch Square Mall, next to Melting Pot, across from one of the old Sounds Familiar stores which is now closed) plenty of parking. All are welcome. Questions, 803-798-8007, or sekhmet@osireion.com, or visit the Columbia (and the Surrounding Areas) Meetup at www.meetup.com

Bring a friend, and come prepared for a great discussion, keeping in mind the following group agreements:
• We’ll announce the topic and/or guest for the evening at 6:30. We recommend that you order your food as soon as possible since we start discussion at 6:30.
• The facilitator will introduce the topic for the night with a question. After this introduction, all are invited to participate by sharing comments and/or questions of your own.
• Please limit your comments to no more than two minutes. A facilitator will call on people, if needed, e.g., if many try to speak at once or we have a very large crowd.
• No personally-affrontive comments are tolerated. Open disrespect of others, or of other religions, will earn you an escort out of the room for the rest of the evening.
• If you are not Pagan, thank you for coming, and you are very welcome to participate, but you may not evangelize or proselytize, or you will be asked to leave.
• At 7:45 PM, the facilitator will begin to draw the discussion to a close. If necessary, the facilitator will say how many more people have time for a comment, or point to the one, two or three people who may speak in the remaining time.

No responses yet

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